Anna has been with Heritage for 9 years and is our water-cooled product specialist. Andy caught up with her in the workshop to talk about the latest range of parts she has sourced for the Mk3 Golf.

Andy: So Anna, Mk3 Golf’s are really starting to rise in popularity, and the values have picked up too. How do you see the next few years playing out with regards to the third generation Golf?

Anna: I think Mk3 Golf’s are going to become more popular, they are still readily available, and can be bought pretty cheaply. As enthusiasts get priced out of the Mk2’s they will naturally turn to the next available Golf. Good VR6 models are now more than £5000 and that’s unlikely to change.

Andy: Should I be taking this opportunity to stockpile all the Genuine VW parts I can now, seeing as these types of part are so sought after for the Mk2 and Mk1 Golfs now?

Anna: You mean like me with Mk2 parts?! The problem is where to keep them all! At some point the Genuine VW parts supply will dry up, even though we can source this stuff through Volkswagen Classic Parts. At that point the values will shoot up due to supply and demand. If you’re considering a Mk3 project, or looking to stay on top of your Mk3 before it condition slips now is the time to buy these parts.

Andy: Which of these parts are Genuine then Anna?

Anna: We’ve got Genuine VW indicator lenses, in both clear and smoked, I think the smoked ones would suit the front of the your car nicely. They’d match your side repeaters too. Plus we’ve got roof rubbers, and genuine front wings too. These roof rubbers are like gold dust for Mk2’s, everyone wants them, although the Mk3 version are bit less complicated, and judging by yours age a little better. The front wings are a common rust spot for the Mk3, especially those with plastic arch trims. I notice even yours is missing the tab in the inner wing where the trim rivets on.

Andy: What about non-genuine parts Anna, you’ve got a rear quarter panel here, and a set of HT leads too?

Anna: I thought I would grab this rear side panel out to show you, as the Mk3 is quite prone to rust. We can’t get these panels for the earlier Golfs anymore, but this would be ideal for fixing accident damage, or to use as a larger repair panel to beat corrosion. The HT Leads are Magnecor ones, and are slightly fatter to encourage a better spark. You only need to feel them to realise they are going to last much better than a set of cheap unbranded leads. I’ve got these in blue on my Mk2 VR6. 

Andy: Do you think there are enough examples out there that don’t need a full restoration still, or are we going to see full nut and bolt restorations happening now, as the values start to go up?

Anna: That’s a tricky one, we’ve lost a whole bunch of ‘modern classics’ to the scrappage schemes over the years, and many have been sacrificed for engine swaps so the Mk3 could become much harder to find a good one in the next few years! According to Wikipedia 4.8 million Mk3’s were made, in comparison to 6.3 million Mk2s so the newer Golf could become rarer in time. As for full restorations, yes there will be some that are ‘worth saving’ whether that is for sentimental reasons, or they are special editions like the Colour Concept or Anniversary GTI.

Andy: What would your tips be for picking up a great investment Mk3 Golf?

Anna: If it was me, I would try to find a good example of an Anniversary, Colour Concept, or VR6. Something that is a little out of the ordinary. As an investment a ‘special edition’ is always going to be worth more. My top tip would be to try and find one that has minimal amount of rust as it’s a very common problem with the Mk3 Golf. Make sure you check thoroughly under all plastic trims as these can be water traps and keep rust hidden. A full service history is always a bonus, but we offer most engine parts from OE companies like Elring so the engine is going to be the easiest part to make good. Failing that there are a lot of rusty examples that the engine could be taken from. I’d say good bodywork is the most important factor.

Andy: Do you think we’re going to see a divide in perceived value between the Cabriolet and Vento versions in comparison to the standard hatchback, as we have with the Mk1 and Mk2 platform? Do these models represent better value for money?

Anna: I couldn’t tell you the last time I saw a Vento on the road, they seem to be getting a lot rarer, although I do have a friend with a VR6 version, and luckily he treasures it.
I think they will become similar to the Jetta, with a small hard core following. There are still quite a lot of Cabriolet models out there, especially with the Mk 3.5 option too. I don’t see the newer cabriolets having the cult following of a Mk1 Golf Cabriolet, but you never know.

Check out our ever growing Mk3 Golf range over on our website   here  If you can’t see what you need, give us a call, or click onto Live Chat, and one of our specialists can check availability for you.

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